Article
27.02.2019

More than a Soldier: Combat Medical Technician

Many people often associate a career in the Armed Forces as one which is dominated by direct combat. Whilst this is present within the armed forces, in this mini blog series, “More than a Soldier,” we‘ll explore a number of professions within the army which you may not have been aware of. In this blog, […]

Many people often associate a career in the Armed Forces as one which is dominated by direct combat. Whilst this is present within the armed forces, in this mini blog series, “More than a Soldier,” we‘ll explore a number of professions within the army which you may not have been aware of. In this blog, we focus on the position of Combat Medical Technician. As the name implies this person’s primary responsibility is medicine orientated. With a wide range of responsibilities ranging from giving first aid to providing health education to the army, the position is varied in nature.

Sound interesting? The entry requirements for the position are relatively simple, you must be between the ages of 16-35 with GCSE Grade’s of A*-C/9-4 in at least English Language and Maths. You should also be able to lift 20 kg, carry 60m, and be able to perform a 1.5 mile run in under 14 minutes.

So, what training do you undertake to become a Combat Medical Technician? Well, once accepted you will start with initial military training for a period of 14 weeks, covering everything from fieldcraft through to handling a rifle, based at Pirbright or Winchester. Following this, you embark on a 22-week course at the Defence School for Education taking part in both theory and practical training as well as placements in medical centres, hospitals and ambulance trusts. Once completed, working under the guidance of doctors you will be stationed in medical centres or front line bases and get to be part of the amazing Army Medical Services (AMS).

With the same opportunities to travel as other soldiers, the position offers the chance to see the world whilst continually learning on the job, aiding career development. “Since completing my training, I’ve deployed on exercise in Kenya, as part of Health Outreach Clinic treatment teams.” I worked in rural villages and received constant encouragement from more qualified medical personnel.” In fact, the chance to learn are not just limited to encouragement and support, there is the chance to gain a Diploma in Emergency and Primary Health Care and a Guilds Certification available in the future. But it is not just career progression which is so attractive to potential recruits, the unit is known to organize social events to help teams with cohesion.

So, if you’re brave, determined and can envisage yourself working on the frontline saving soldiers’ lives, click here to start your application today.

 

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